How to Change the Thickness of the Stitch on My Singer Sewing Machine

Written by patti perry
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How to Change the Thickness of the Stitch on My Singer Sewing Machine
Sewing machine stitches are adjusted for length and width. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

The size of a sewing machine's stitches is referred to as the length of the stitch. Singer sewing machines have easy-to-use controls for stitch length. There are two dials to adjust a multitude of stitch choices on newer machines. Older machines have a lever to change the stitch size. Perfect stitches are formed when the bobbin slides by the needle at its deepest point. The thread and needle both affect the stitch quality.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Instructions

    Older Machines

  1. 1

    Turn the thumb screw on the stitch gauge to loosen it.

  2. 2

    Move the thumb screw down in its slot to make a longer stitch. Older machines do not have a method to change the width of a stitch. All changes to stitches are referred to in length increments.

  3. 3

    Tighten the screw to secure the thumb screw and maintain even stitches.

    Newer Machines

  1. 1

    Locate the stitch dials on the front of the machine. A reference guide printed on Singer sewing machines indicates the stitch possibilities.

  2. 2

    Scroll through the different stitches until you find the one you want to use. Selected stitches appear in a window.

  3. 3

    Adjust the width and length of the stitch with the dials. They both can be adjusted by 5 millimetres.

Tips and warnings

  • Determine the best size of needle for the type of fabric you are using. Needle size is rated by fabric weight. Needles are designated 60/8 for lightweight material and go up to 120/19 for extremely heavy fabrics.
  • Pull thread through the needle's eye to make certain it passes easily. This assures that stitches will be even.

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