How to Write a Formal Warning Letter for Tardiness

Written by natalie smith
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How to Write a Formal Warning Letter for Tardiness
Don't rush; leave early enough to arrive with time to spare. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Almost every workplace and every class from kindergarten to college has a policy that defines and prohibits tardiness. When you are late, you give the impression that the event or person waiting for you is not important. In the workplace, you may leave clients and customers waiting for you before they can finish their task. As a manager, you must warn employees formally when their lateness becomes habitual or when they have been late enough times to merit a warning from management.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Begin the letter by typing the date. Skip a line, and type the employee's name and her home address on separate lines. Create the salutation by typing "Dear Mr./Ms. (Employee's last name)" followed by a colon.

  2. 2

    Tell the employee that his lateness has become unacceptable and that this letter serves as his official warning to be on time in the future.

  3. 3

    Detail the other times she has been late, and include the dates and times. Explain which rule her lateness has violated, and if applicable, refer her to the appropriate page in the handbook or on the website that contains the rules for her reference.

  4. 4

    Explain what will happen under this policy if he is late again. Be specific about the warning process and how he can appeal, if applicable.

  5. 5

    Provide action information in the closing paragraph. Tell her if she needs to sign a statement, for example. Provide your telephone number and e-mail in case she has any questions.

  6. 6

    Type "Sincerely," and skip three line spaces. Type your full name and title. Print the letter on company letterhead and sign the letter.

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