How to grow strawberries in a two litre bottle

Written by audrey pannell
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How to grow strawberries in a two litre bottle
One way to recycle a plastic bottle is by turning it into a planter. (Ingram Publishing/Ingram Publishing/Getty Images)

Sweet strawberries are a tasty fruit that many enjoy and organic, chemical-free versions are sought after. You can grow them yourself from home and, if you're big on recycling, you can grow them in a 2 litre (68 fl oz) bottle. For an eclectic, organic garden of potted strawberry plants recycle many bottles and hang some while standing others. The bottles protect the roots of the plant and ensure that no weeds compete for the soil. Therefore, it's a win-win -- your plant is protected from the elements in a recycled container and you'll enjoy sweet, organic strawberries without even going to the supermarket.

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Things you need

  • Strawberry seeds or small plant
  • Empty 2 litre (68 fl oz) bottle
  • Drill
  • 6.5 mm (1/4 inch) drill bit
  • Stick
  • Waterproof spray paint
  • String
  • Potting soil
  • Handful of small pebbles
  • Marker
  • Scissors
  • Activated charcoal
  • Spaghnum or Spanish moss

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    Upside-down hanger

  1. 1

    Clean and dry the bottle thoroughly.

  2. 2

    Draw a line with a marker a couple of centimetres above the bottom, at the natural ridge.

  3. 3

    Cut the bottle along the marker line with a pair of scissors.

  4. 4

    Drill a small hole in the centre of the bottom part you cut off.

  5. 5

    Place the bottom you cut off upside down and inside the cut-end of the other part until the cut areas line up and are evenly together.

  6. 6

    Drill two small holes across from each other using. Put the holes about 6.5 mm (1/4 inch) down from the top of the cut ends that are lined up with one another.

  7. 7

    Push the stick through the holes. Tie string from both sides of the stick so you can hang the planter.

  8. 8

    Turn the planter over, exposing the mouth of the bottle. Pour potting mix into the container and then push in some spaghnum or Spanish moss -- enough to cover the potting mix by 1.25 cm (1/2 inch).

  9. 9

    Wrap a coffee filter around the roots of your small strawberry plant. Push the covered roots through the mouth and turn the planter over so the plant is hanging out of the mouth. Hang the planter in a sunny area.

  10. 10

    Pour some water into the top of the planter so it drips through the small hole you drilled. Keep the soil damp but not too wet.

    Indoor bottle planter

  1. 1

    Clean and dry the plastic bottle.

  2. 2

    Draw a line with a marker about 15 cm (6 inches) up from the bottom of the bottle.

  3. 3

    Cut along the line with a pair of scissors. Place a handful of pebbles in the bottom part until they are about 5 cm (2 inches) deep.

  4. 4

    Place a thin layer of activated charcoal on top of the pebbles. It will act as a purifier for the water as it flows up and down. You can buy activated charcoal at an aquarium or some pet shops.

  5. 5

    Put a thin layer of spaghnum or Spanish moss on top of the activated charcoal and cover with enough potting soil to plant seeds or a small strawberry plant in.

  6. 6

    Wet the potting soil until it is moist but not soaked. Plant six to 10 strawberry seeds about 6.5 mm (1/4 inch) into the soil or plant a small strawberry plant into the soil.

  7. 7

    Place the top part of the bottle over the bottom part so it is all now one piece and the plant or planted seeds are completely inside the bottle.

  8. 8

    Place the bottle in a sunny location where it will receive about six hours of sunlight a day.

Tips and warnings

  • Plant strawberries in March or early April after the last frost.

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