How do I Insulate Eves & Attic?

Updated February 21, 2017

Insulating your attic will help your home stay warm in winter and cool in summer. Insulation comes in 16- and 24-inch widths, and has different R values (thickness of insulation) for walls, ceilings and floors. Different geographical area also required different R values. Insulation comes in rolls, and usually has a paper vapour barrier on one side. This barrier has a lip on each edge for staples to attach it to the joists on both sides.

Place the roll of insulation at one end of the first floor space between the ceiling joists, over the eave. Unroll it---paper vapour barrier down---between the joists so it reaches from one side of the attic to the other eave. Repeat this process until the entire floor of the attic has been covered with insulation.

Place the ladder at one end of the attic. Unroll the insulation and push it between the ceiling joists, starting at the top by the roof's central beam. Make sure the vapour barrier is facing you.

Staple the vapour barrier lips to the joists on each side, installing the staples 8 inches apart. Continue pushing the insulation between the joists and stapling it in place, until you reach the bottom of that section.

Cut the insulation with scissors at the bottom. Move to the next section, starting at the top as before. Continue on until all attic walls have been insulated.


The paper vapour barrier is always installed to the warm side where heat will be retained, and not the cold side. Wear gloves and a face mask when installing insulation.

Things You'll Need

  • Insulation
  • Ladder
  • Staple gun
  • 1/2-inch staples
  • Scissors
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About the Author

Steve Sloane started working as a freelance writer in 2007. He has written articles for various websites, using more than a decade of DIY experience to cover mostly construction-related topics. He also writes movie reviews for Inland SoCal. Sloane holds a Bachelor of Arts in creative writing and film theory from the University of California, Riverside.