How to Plant Dwarf Sags

Written by diane dilov-schultheis
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Dwarf sag (Sagittaria subulata), known as dwarf sagittaria or narrow leaf sag, is an easy-to-grow aquatic plant from the Alismataceae family that originated in eastern North America and South America. Used in aquariums, dwarf sag resemble grass and occasionally produces an extended flower stem up to the surface where tiny white blossoms appear. The plant adapts to most water conditions, including pH levels ranging from 5.5 to 8.0 and temperatures anywhere between 17.8 to 28.9 degrees Celsius. Plant dwarf sags individually or in clusters throughout the tank.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Plant dwarf sags in tanks with small-sized gravel or sand substrate for the best results. Add sand to the site selected for planting if the tank's gravel is medium or large sized.

  2. 2

    Hold the dwarf sag plant and gently push the roots to the bottom of the substrate. Pull the plant up until the upper part of the root crown rests just above the substrate.

  3. 3

    Space the dwarf sags 1 to 2 inches apart.

  4. 4

    Add an iron supplement or increase the lighting in the tank if the dwarf sag plants don't grow within a month after planting.

Tips and warnings

  • Dwarf sag's light requirement ranges from low to high, or 1.5 to 4 watts per gallon. The amount of light provided and the nutrients in the tank's substrate affect the plant's overall size, which varies from 2 to 16 inches.
  • This fast-growing plant can spread quickly to create a thick carpet in the tank from runners (baby plants) that grow from the parent plants. New plants emerging from the dwarf sag may be left to grow in place, or separated and moved to another location or a different tank. After the baby plants mature, cut the roots to half the size of the parents, to divide the plants.

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