How to Brew Soju

Written by cinda roth
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How to Brew Soju
Brewing 1 cup of wine in 2010 in Fresno, California costs less than 60p. (four wine glasses with white wine image by Arkady Ten from Fotolia.com)

Brewing soju, a Korean rice wine, saves money and enables you to adjust the alcohol and sugar content to your personal tastes. Brewing soju can be done in approximately three weeks at a cost (in 2010) of less than 60p a cup in Fresno, California. Costs may vary based on locale.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Rice steamer
  • 6 cups cold water
  • 8 tablespoons Nuruk Enzyme
  • Sealable container
  • 1 package beer yeast
  • Colander
  • Cheesecloth
  • 4 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 cups white rice
  • Pot

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Place 2 cups white rice in colander and rinse in cool water.

  2. 2

    Place in rice steamer and add cool water. Allow to soak for one hour.

  3. 3

    Steam in rice steamer for one hour then remove and cool for five minutes.

  4. 4

    Place steamed rice in sealable container and add 4 cups cold water, 8 tablespoons Nuruk enzyme, and yeast. Stir until enzyme and yeast is dissolved and seal container.

  5. 5

    Stir mixture twice a day for the first five days sealing container after each stirring. Allow container to sit undisturbed for the following two weeks or until the air lock stops fizzing.

  6. 6

    Put cheesecloth in colander and position colander over pot so liquid will filter through colander into pot. Pour mixture from container into colander.

  7. 7

    Pour two cups of water into colander over rice.

  8. 8

    Add 4 tablespoons of sugar to wine in pot and stir until dissolved.

  9. 9

    Pour and serve.

Tips and warnings

  • Allow to sit undisturbed for longer time period for higher alcohol content.
  • Add additional sugar for sweeter wine.
  • Add additional water to finished wine to dilute alcohol content if desired.
  • Nuruk available at many Asian markets or can be made via recipe in "Handbook of Indigenous Fermented Foods."
  • Watch for gas build-up in sealed container and vent if necessary to release pressure.

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