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How to Shield an Outdoor Thermometer

Updated July 20, 2017

Outdoor thermometers are informational and fun for the weather buffs in all of us; however, exposure to direct sunlight can sometimes skew accurate temperature readings. One way to overcome this dilemma is by building a small shield to house your outdoor thermometer. A small wood shield to house your outdoor thermometer can be built using only a piece of plywood and a few finishing nails. With the right supplies, you can build a thermometer shield in less than 30 minutes.

Lay your thermometer back side down on a piece of plywood.

Mark the length from top to bottom. Also mark the width of your thermometer in pencil on the piece of plywood.

Set the thermometer aside and saw out a back, two sides and a top and bottom from the piece of plywood, using the pencil marking measurements you made to judge the size. The size of your shield will depend on the size of your thermometer.

Attach the two plywood sides to the piece of plywood that will be the back of your thermometer shield. Attach one side by placing it against the back of the shield and hammering in two finishing nails, one at the top and one at the bottom. Attach the other side in the same way.

Attach the thermometer itself by screwing a wood screw through its top mounting hole into the plywood back.

Attach the top and bottom of the shield by hammering them into place with the finishing nails. Once assembled, the top, bottom and sides should protrude out from the back by around 3 to 4 inches -- just enough to shade the thermometer from direct exposure to the sun.

Screw the shoulder hook into the top of the shield. Once screwed in, the thermometer and shield can be hung from a wire, clothesline or hanging plant hook.

Things You'll Need

  • Piece of plywood
  • Pencil
  • Saw
  • 1/4-inch finishing nails
  • Two small wood screws (shorter than 1/4 inch if possible)
  • Hammer
  • Shoulder hook
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About the Author

Ashton Daigle, a New Orleans native, graduated from Southeastern Louisiana University in 1998 and went straight to work as a journalist. In 2005 he tackled the biggest news story of his life - Hurricane Katrina. Daigle is writing a collection of essays: What It Means to be a Saints Fan.