How to Build a Basic LP Record Storage Case

Written by scott danielson
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How to Build a Basic LP Record Storage Case
Your Record Collection (Close up of old Vinyl Records - focus on the record image by Andrew Brown from Fotolia.com)

If your vinyl LP collection is expanding beyond control, you'll need some storage space to hold it. You have several options for storage, such as shelves, plastic baskets, or cardboard boxes. However, one of the most aesthetically pleasing options is the classic wooden crate.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • 1/2-inch sheet lumber (pine)
  • 3/8-inch sheet lumber (plywood)
  • Nails
  • Drill
  • Finish

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Cut the two ends of your crate from the pine sheet lumber. These should measure 14x10 inches.

  2. 2

    Cut six rails from your plywood sheet lumber. These should be about 4-inches wide, and as long as you want your crate to be. The length can vary, depending on the size of your collection. A good starting length is 15 inches.

  3. 3

    Drill pilot holes in the rails. This will keep your rails from splitting when you nail them to your ends. Drill two pilot holes in each end of each rail, using a drill bit slightly smaller than the nail.

  4. 4

    Apply your desired finish to the wood. This can include staining or painting. Allow the finish to set and dry before assembling the crate.

  5. 5

    Assemble the crate. Nail the rails to the ends, using two nails at each end of each rail. Attach two rails to the bottom, and two rails to each side.

Tips and warnings

  • If you want to set your crate on a table or other piece of furniture without risking damage, consider adding feet to the crate. This can be anything you can find, including small pieces of self-adhesive felt.
  • Nailing the ends of the plywood without drilling pilot holes can split the ends of the rails, causing you to have to cut new rails. Pilot holes will prevent this by relieving most of the stress applied to the wood when nailing.

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