Prevent Moisture With Desiccants

Written by kimberly johnson
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A desiccant is any material that absorbs water from the air. Two of the more frequently used desiccants are silica and clay. These substances are sold in granular form to the general public to prevent mould and musty odours inside the home. Commercial businesses place desiccant packages into their product boxes to prevent moisture damage during shipping. Although desiccants do a good job of removing excess moisture from the air, they should not be used to resolve ongoing high-humidity problems.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • 454gr. plastic cup
  • Cheesecloth
  • Rubber band

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Use the right type of desiccant packaging for the size area. If you are preventing moisture in small spaces, such as drawers or boxes, use small, stamp-sized desiccant packages. For larger areas such a closets or even full rooms, choose container style desiccants that have a water reservoir in the bottom of them.

  2. 2

    Use the proper amount of desiccant for the size of the area. In general for rooms and areas larger than 6.6 sq. feet use at least 180gr. of desiccant. For smaller storage boxes you can use up to 42.5gr. of desiccant. You really can't use too much desiccant, but there is no need to overdo it.

  3. 3

    Place the desiccant in a location where as much of it is exposed as possible. When placing the desiccant into a box or storage container, place it on top of any other items near the lid.

  4. 4

    Check the desiccant on a weekly basis and discard any water in the containers, or replace saturated granules with new ones.

  5. 5

    Place loose clay or silica desiccant granules into a 454gr. plastic cup and cover the cup with a piece of cheesecloth or loose weave fabric. Secure the fabric with a rubber band around the cup.

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