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How to make a custom cookie cutter

You can buy cookie cutters in all sorts of shapes and sizes. But sometimes you want something out of the ordinary. When that time comes, consider making your own. It's easier than you'd think, and they can be made from materials easily found at your local home store. Handmade cookie cutters make unique gifts, too.

Draw or trace your cookie cutter design on a piece of paper. Go around the outline with the string and cut so the ends just touch. Measure the string to figure out how much foil you need.

Cut foil from the bottom of the pan into a 2.5-cm (1-inch) thick strip that is 2.5 cm longer than the string length. If necessary, piece together, adding 2.5 cm for each additional section. Tape the sections together, overlapping the ends by 13 mm (1/2 inch) and using double-sided tape.

Cut out your paper design and use it as a pattern to cut out two from the remaining foil pan. Tape these together. This will be used as the form to mould your cookie cutter.

Hold one end of the foil strip to a starting place on the mould. Carefully work around the mould, bending the strip on end around the edges. Use a pencil or chop stick to help make sharper turns if necessary. When you've made your way all the way around, the ends should over lap by half an inch. Secure these ends with double-sided tape.

Use hot glue to attach the mould to the top of the foil outline. The glue should be an inch from the cutting edge. This will help the cookie cutter hold its shape. Your new cookie cutter is hand washable.

Tip

Take care when washing your cookie cutter that you don't push the soft foil out of shape.

Things You'll Need

  • 1 large foil pan
  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • String
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Double-sided tape
  • Hot glue gun
  • Hot glue stick
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About the Author

Shaunta Alburger has been a professional writer for 15 years. She's worked on staff at both major Las Vegas newspapers, as well as a rural Nevada weekly. Her first novel was published in 2014.