How to Cite Website Sources

Written by nathan adler
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How to Cite Website Sources
MLA and APA web citations change almost every year. (text and words image by Lario Tus from Fotolia.com)

The two most common styles of citing sources are the MLA and the APA styles. These style guides cover the majority of news and scholarly papers available today. While these two style guides are similar, there are some key differences in nearly every form of citation. As web citation becomes more common, the methods used to cite articles change. It is always a good idea to verify that the methods you are using are the most current ones available.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Use the following format for a web article: Last name, First name. "Article Title." <i>Site Name.</i> Organization Name. Article date. Web. Date of access.

  2. 2

    Look at this example: Kinver, Mark. "'Green Light' for Global Biodiversity Science Panel." <i>BBC News.</i> BBC. 06/14/10. Web. 06/14/10.

  3. 3

    Place the author's last name alone in parentheses when using an inline citation and do not add a page number. If the article doesn't have an author, use the top-level web address instead without the header, such as '(news.bbc.co.uk)' if citing the article above.

  1. 1

    Use this format for a web article: Last name, First name. (Date of publication). Title of article. <i>Title of Online Periodical or Website.</i> Retrieved from [Full URL].

  2. 2

    Look at this example: Kinver, Mark. (06/14/10). 'Green Light' for Global Biodiversity Science Panel. <i>BBC News.</i> Retrieved from http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science_and_environment/10307761.stm.>

  3. 3

    Make inline citations by placing the author's last name and the year of publication in parenthesis. If there is no author, replace his name with the name of the publishing organisation or the name of the article.

Tips and warnings

  • If an article doesn't have an author, publisher or date, do not leave that section out. Use the abbreviations n.a., n.p. and n.d. to indicate that the information is unavailable.

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