How to Report a MoneyGram Scam

Written by jackie whalen
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How to Report a MoneyGram Scam
Con artists use MoneyGram to scam consumers. (money image by Valentin Mosichev from Fotolia.com)

MoneyGram is a fast way to send and receive money throughout the world. Unfortunately, con artists also use MoneyGram scams to con unsuspecting victims out of their money. One common scam is for a con artist to send you a counterfeit check or money order and ask you to cash it at your bank and send part of the funds through MoneyGram back to the sender. The person will tell you the check is legitimate but that he has no way of cashing it because he does not have a U.S. bank account. If you fall for the scam and cash the check, your bank will charge you when the check turns out to be counterfeit. Another common scam is the thief will send you an e-mail message congratulating you on winning the lottery or a large monetary prize. The catch is that you must pay taxes or customs fees through MoneyGram before you are allowed to claim your prize. Unfortunately, there is no prize, just a large monetary loss for the victim. If you or someone you know have been the victim of a MoneyGram scam, it is critical to report it to the proper authorities.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Report the scam to a local law enforcement agency. The police may try to recover your money, but it is highly unlikely they will be able to.

  2. 2

    Report the scam online to the Internet Fraud Complaint Center at ic3.gov. The centre is a collaboration between the FBI, the Bureau of Justice Assistance, and the National White Collar Crime Center.

  3. 3

    Report the scam to your state attorney general. A list of states' attorneys general is available at naag.org.

Tips and warnings

  • If you sent money to a scammer using a credit card or debit card, you may be able to dispute the charges with your bank and get your money back.
  • The FBI warns to never reply to or click on links contained in an unsolicited e-mail message. Only open e-mail messages and attachments from people you know and trust, and directly contact the business or person who sent you the email message so that you can verify the person's identity.

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