How to calculate hourly pay

Written by bill brown
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How to calculate hourly pay
Calculate hourly wage from your pay stub. (Pennies on the Dollar - one dollar bill with pennies. image by Andy Dean from Fotolia.com)

If your pay stub does not show your hourly wage, you can calculate it yourself by dividing total wage by the number of hours worked during the pay period. An annual hourly wage can be figured in the same way, but you will need to know the total number of hours you worked in that year. This can be extrapolated from your average work week.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Calculator
  • Pay stub

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Check your pay stub to see the number of hours you are being paid for, and divide the total pay by the number of hours. Use the gross pay, not the net pay after deductions, to get the base hourly wage. If your gross pay was £409.50 for a 35-hour work week, that comes to a wage of £11.70 an hour.

  2. 2

    Calculate your net hourly pay by dividing the amount of your check by the number of hours worked. This will give you your net hourly pay after taxes, Social Security and other deductions. For a net pay of £318.50 for a 35-hour work week, the net pay is £9.10 an hour.

  3. 3

    Figure your annual hourly pay by dividing the total annual pay by the total number of hours worked during the year. A 40-hour-a-week job means you are paid for 2,080 hours a year. A quick but inexact way to calculate your annual hourly wage is to divide the yearly salary by 2,000, so that a £23,400 salary amounts to about £11.70 an hour for the year. Use the precise number of hours worked--2,080-- for a more accurate annual hourly pay rate.

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