How to Write a Sample of a Will

Written by cameron easey
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How to Write a Sample of a Will
A sample will can be used as a first draft (Hand and document at the meeting image by Dmitry Goygel-Sokol from Fotolia.com)

A sample of a will can be written to demonstrate how the structure of the will should be set up when it is to be officially written. Writing a sample of a will can be considered a rough draft which allows you to make changes by trial and error. You can create a sample of a will by beginning the document in a word processing program on your laptop or desktop computer.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Open a word processing program on your computer, such as Microsoft Word.

  2. 2

    Start a first paragraph that states your name and address. Indicate in a sentence that this is your last will and testament.

  3. 3

    Start a second paragraph that states the executor of your estate and an alternate if your original choice is not available or is deceased.

  4. 4

    Start a third paragraph that states the name and address for each of your beneficiaries

  5. 5

    Start a fourth section to explain what you wish to bequeath to your beneficiaries.

  6. 6

    Start a fifth paragraph to dictate or instruct how the executor should manage your estate.

  7. 7

    Start a sixth paragraph that states the name and address of the guardian for your children, if necessary.

  8. 8

    Include additional paragraphs to explain how items or requests, that you did not specifically mention in the preceding paragraphs, should be divided or carried out.

  9. 9

    Review the sample will to give you an idea of how long it will be and if you need to include more or less information.

Tips and warnings

  • If you want to donate money to charity an additional paragraph will be needed after step 4.

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