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How to Needle Felt Flowers

Updated March 23, 2017

Needle felting, a process of creating a felt fabric from carded wool fibres by meshing the fibres with a barbed needle, is an easy craft to learn. Once you've got the hang of needle felting, you can create textured sculptures, accessories or small embellishments. Flowers are a popular needle felting project for felters of all levels, as they use up small leftover bits of wool and make beautiful brooches or pendants.

Needle felt your leftover wool scraps on your felting surface. Work the felt into an even sheet approximately 1 inch thick.

Draw petal shapes on the sheet of felt using tailor's chalk. You can use your imagination to design the petals or use a traditional teardrop shape. Varying the petal's sizes will add textural interest to your finished flower.

Cut out the petal shapes with scissors.

Choose a small piece of the leftover felt to use as a base. Take one of the petals and needle felt it to the base.

Turn the petal and base over, and needle felt into the back side to ensure that the petal is well attached.

Choose another petal and felt it to the base. Turn over and needle felt the back to secure it.

Repeat Step 6, using all the petals, arranging them into a flower shape that pleases you.

Add a few drops of dish washing soap to a basin of water, and agitate to make suds.

Submerge the needle felted flower, and squeeze the suds through the felt.

Rinse the flower in clean water until all the soap is out. Squeeze out extra water or roll in a clean towel.

Arrange the wet felt flower into your desired shape and allow to dry.

Tip

Attach a small pin back to the base of your flower to wear as a brooch. Sew a special or vintage button into the flower's front centre.

Things You'll Need

  • Leftover wool fibre
  • Felting needles
  • Felting surface (such as a sponge)
  • Tailor's chalk
  • Scissors
  • Basin
  • Liquid dishwashing soap
  • Clean towel (optional)
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About the Author

A writer and professional lab assistant based in Seattle, Kate Bruscke has been writing professionally about health care and technology since 1998. Her freelance clients include "The Seattle Times," KGB.com, Reading Local: Seattle, Nordstrom and MSN/Microsoft. Bruscke holds a Master of Fine Arts from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.