How Do I Transfer a House Out of My Name to My Daughter's Name?

Written by neal litherland
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How Do I Transfer a House Out of My Name to My Daughter's Name?
Fill out the right paperwork. (folder image by Igor Shootov from Fotolia.com)

Transferring property such as a home to anyone, even a family member or spouse, can be an involved process. It isn't necessarily difficult but there can be a lot of red tape, especially if the house isn't fully paid for yet or there are liens on it. For the following instructions, assume that the house is paid for and that all you're doing is transferring an owned property from one owner to another. Anything more complicated will likely require legal counsel.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Quitclaim deed
  • Property deed

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Make sure that you have the deed to your home. In order for you to transfer the ownership of it, you'll first need your deed, which will provide you with information you'll need for the transfer document.

  2. 2

    Acquire a quitclaim deed. This is a document that is used to simply transfer the property from one person to another and it may be found at any county courthouse. Fill out all the necessary places in the quitclaim deed so that it's ready to be filed.

  3. 3

    Go with your daughter to the local courthouse to file your quitclaim. Essentially this means that the government is witnessing your property transfer and recording it into the public record. Once this is complete, the property is effectively transferred from your name into your daughter's name.

Tips and warnings

  • If you can afford to, you should consult a real estate lawyer. There are other methods of property transfer that are more complicated but many of them will save both parties money in the end.
  • Make sure that you aren't transferring the property to avoid some sort of criminal or civil suit. If the government discovers that you've done so, then the property transfer may be undone because it will be considered unlawful.

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