How to use dried seaweed as fertilizer

Written by larry simmons
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How to use dried seaweed as fertilizer
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Dried seaweed can be used as an organic fertiliser rich in nitrogen and potassium to aid in a plant’s growth cycle. Using dried seaweed can be done in two basic ways: by converting the dried seaweed into a liquid for spray application directly to the plants and soil; or by placing the dried seaweed onto the soil itself for absorption. Spraying the plants tends to provide the greatest amounts of nutrients, but using the seaweed unaltered enables quicker application. Either method will only help your plants grow faster and healthier by replacing needed nutrients not provided by the soil.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Dried seaweed
  • Water
  • Bucket
  • Large jar
  • Handled strainer
  • Spray bottle

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Place 0.113kg. of dried seaweed into a gallon of water. Stir to completely mix the seaweed throughout. Allow the seaweed to sit for three days so the water can absorb the nutrients contained within the seaweed.

  2. 2

    Place a large jar next to the bucket. Shake the bucket slightly to completely release the nutrients from the soaked seaweed. Pour the liquid from the bucket into the jar through a strainer to strain the dried seaweed and collect the nutrient-full water.

  3. 3

    Pour the nutrient-full water into a spray bottle. Spray the leaves and stems of the plants to apply the fertiliser. Fertiliser can be sprayed onto the soil as well.

  4. 4

    Use the seaweed still in its dried state by sprinkling it directly onto the soil and watering as normal. The seaweed will turn green with the addition of the water and decompose into the soil over time, releasing its nutrients to the root system to be absorbed by the plants.

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