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How to Glue Pebbles to Glass

Pebbles can add textural interest to many ready-made glass objects, such as candle holders, tables, wine glasses, vases, decorative dishes and jars. And they can come in very handy for one-of-a-kind craft projects, such as pebble-and-glass kitchen backsplashes. Combining the sculpted pebbles with the smooth, sleek lines of glass can create an eye-catching feature in any room of your home. All it takes is some creativity and the right type of glue.

Spray the glass with glass cleaner, and wipe it dry with a paper towel.

Wash the pebbles with distilled white vinegar, and spread them out on a paper towel to air-dry for 20 minutes.

Mix a low-viscosity, two-component epoxy adhesive per the manufacturer's instructions in a plastic bowl. A strong dissimilar-material epoxy, such as EP30, is mixed with a 4-to-1 ratio by weight.

Stir the two components together with a small paintbrush.

Paint a thin, even layer of the prepared epoxy onto the glass surface with the paintbrush.

Apply a thin layer of epoxy to the bottom of the pebble, press it to the glass, pull it slightly away from the glass for one to three minutes to stretch the glue, and then press the pebble firmly back into place on the glass. Repeat this pebble-gluing process until all of the pebbles have been placed.

Tip

A multidimensional glaze can be applied to finished pieces to smooth the surface and add a gloss or matt finish to the pebbles.

Warning

Wear rubber gloves while using epoxy adhesives to protect your hands.

Things You'll Need

  • Glass cleaner
  • Paper towel
  • Distilled white vinegar
  • Low-viscosity, two-component epoxy adhesive
  • Plastic bowl
  • Paintbrush
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About the Author

Based in Covington, Tenn., Cheryl Torrie has been writing how-to articles since 2008. Her articles appear on eHow. Torrie received a certificate in travel and tourism from South Eastern Academy and is enrolled in a computer information systems program at Tennessee Technology Center at Covington.