How to Treat Foot Supination

Written by reannan raine
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Email

Foot supination can be a hereditary condition or caused by an injury to the ankle. It involves a lifting of the arch (commonly called a "high arch") and a tendency to tilt to the outside of the foot. The condition can cause foot pain, heel spurs, shin splints and even knee, hip and lower back pain. People with foot supination are more likely to suffer sprains and ruptured ligaments. Foot supination is best treated with orthotic inserts and properly fitted shoes.

Skill level:
Easy

Other People Are Reading

Things you need

  • Supportive shoes
  • Orthotic inserts

Show MoreHide

Instructions

  1. 1

    Consult a qualified podiatrist for a complete examination of your feet. Have a "foot strike" and "running gait" analysis done. After a thorough evaluation, the podiatrist can recommend proper footwear and orthotics if necessary.

  2. 2

    Go to a speciality shoe store and have your feet measured. Have both the length and width of your foot measured to make sure you are choosing the proper size shoe.

  3. 3

    Shop for shoes later in the afternoon or evening. Your feet naturally swell slightly during the course of the day. Purchasing shoes early in the morning will likely result in shoes that are too tight later in the day.

  4. 4

    Wear socks that are the thickness you will usually wear with your new shoes when you go to the store to try them on. Thick socks can make a shoe that initially fits with thin socks too small.

  5. 5

    Purchase shoes that are suited for your foot type and running gait according to your podiatrist's recommendations. They may be a little more expensive but they will pay for themselves in no time by providing good support for your feet.

Tips and warnings

  • Do not buy shoes that feel tight, thinking that they will stretch to fit as you wear them. Buy shoes that fit properly in the first place.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.