How to write a letter to request a waiver on a parking citation

Written by lisa russell Google
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If you want a waiver for a parking ticket, then you need to clarify your reasons precisely, give evidence that you are in the right and ask for exactly what you want. No judge will take you seriously if you include your life story, and that's why many letter writers fail to get what they want. Learn how to write a letter to request a waiver on a parking citation that actually communicates what you want and get out of paying the ticket.

Skill level:

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Things you need

  • Typewriter or printer
  • Ticket number
  • Photo of the parking space (if applicable) or sign

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  1. 1

    State the facts in the beginning. For example; "I am writing in regards to citation #_" received on June 5th at the corner of Summitview Road and 96th Street."

  2. 2

    Name the specific parking law that you were cited for. For example, "I was cited for parking more than 6 inches from the curb."

  3. 3

    Say exactly why you believe your ticked should be waived. For example, "I believe this ticket should be waived because there was a build-up of ice in the gutter when I parked, making it impossible for me to get close enough to the curb or to even see the edge."

  4. 4

    Defend your character, if you can. For example, "I've been a driving instructor in this town since 1981 and have never once received a parking citation. Furthermore, neither have any of my students."

  5. 5

    Promise to abide by parking laws in the future. For example, "I realise the importance of safety-based parking requirements and will continue to strive to park within 6 inches of the curb."

  6. 6

    Include photos of the parking area if you have them, or other evidence that may support your claim.

  7. 7

    Ask specifically to have the ticket waived. For example, "I am respectfully requesting a one-time waiver on this citation due to the extenuating weather conditions."

Tips and warnings

  • Have a friend proofread your letter for grammar and spelling.
  • Use a business letter format
  • Include your driver's license number under your address
  • Never include personal details. While it might be relevant to you that you parked in a handicapped spot because you had a migraine or because you were tired from working back-to-back swing shifts, it's not relevant to your claim. You will not be taken seriously and you'll look like a whiner.

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