The Average Salary of a Commodity Futures Broker

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The Average Salary of a Commodity Futures Broker
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A commodity futures broker is a financial trader who specialises in the buying and selling of obligations to purchase an agricultural product or natural resource at a certain price in the future. Commodity futures brokers counsel clients about what commodities are likely to go up in value and when to sell futures in order to make a profit.

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Work Experience

As of October 2009, commodity futures brokers earned average annual salaries of between £20,088 and £29,127 during their first four years of work in the field. By contrast, futures brokers with 10 to 19 years of experience averaged between £33,064 and £159,678, according to a leading website.

Employer Types

Publicly traded companies paid commodity futures brokers average maximum salaries of £44,765, while maximum salaries at private firms were only an average of £37,045, according to October 2009 reporting.

Employer Specialty

As of October 2009, futures brokers who worked for brokerage houses that specialised in many areas of investing earned considerably more than their counterparts whose companies offered only commodity futures; average maximum salaries were £165,321 and £52,260, respectively.

Geography

The highest-paying state for a commodity futures broker was New York, where brokers were earning an annual average of between £29,003 and £79,354 as of October 2009. Other high-paying states for futures brokers were Illinois and Texas.

Benefits

Commodity futures brokers frequently receive benefits that increase their overall compensation, such as 401k retirement plans, paid sick leave, life and disability insurance and between 1.4 and 3 weeks of paid vacation.

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