Ovarian cancer & leg pain

Written by somer taylor
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Leg pain is one symptom of ovarian cancer. Since this disease can progress without any initial symptoms, it is important to observe any sudden and persistent problems that you may experience, such as leg pain. It is for this reason that having regular pelvic examinations like pap smears is important for women over 18 years old.

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Ovarian cancer is a disease that is characterised, like other cancers, by the development of abnormal cell growth resulting in tumours. Cancerous cells may then spread to other parts of the body via the lymphatic system or bloodstream, thereby creating other tumours in various parts of the body.

Leg Pain

Since the ovaries are near the pelvic bones and the nerves that lead to the leg, a tumour in that area may press against the nerves, causing leg pain.

Not Ignoring Pain

Sara Daniels is a survivor of ovarian cancer who states that by investigating her troublesome leg pain, she was diagnosed with Stage 2 ovarian cancer. Since this form of cancer tends to be diagnosed in stages 3 or 4, this was a fortunate early diagnosis, and she was able to get treatment and has remained in remission at the time of the blog publication in 2008 (see Resources).

Symptoms

Common symptoms of ovarian cancer include lower back pain that may radiate out to the leg, pelvic pain, constipation, bloating, indigestion, abnormal vaginal bleeding, pain during intercourse and frequent urination (see Resources).

Risk Factors

There are several risk factors for ovarian cancer, including having a family history of the disease, having a personal history of breast, uterine, rectal or colon cancer, being over 55 and never being pregnant. It should be noted that some women who lacked major risk factors have developed the disease (see Resources).

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