Business Planning Job Description

Written by alyssa guzman
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Business Planning Job Description
Business planning managers help ensure businesses run efficiently and generate profit. (business woman image by huaxiadragon from Fotolia.com)

Business planning managers support and coordinate business activities and management operations of corporations and other business organisations. They provide practical and creative input to the development of new business programs and oversee all aspects of daily business activities. Business managers bring discipline to the strategic decision-making process and promote the efficient use of business resources. They work closely with managers at the senior and executive levels and assist them with efforts to expnd the business.

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Career Profile

Business planners focus on an organisation’s strategic vision and long-term success. Although their duties vary based on the business needs of their employer, business planners usually plan, organise and coordinate the implementation of their employer’s strategic plans. They typically manage business programs designed to increase brand awareness, improve customer service and business relationships, attract new customers and develop new revenue streams. Some managers also manage business development and sales teams and other personnel who work on an organisation’s revenue-generating initiatives.

Education

Academic excellence in university-level business management and administration courses is a standard method of obtaining the knowledge required for a career in business planning. Although the formal education and professional experience required for business planning jobs varies by company, many employers prefer candidates with a master's degree in business administration and significant professional experience. Qualified individuals with strong finance, marketing or accounting backgrounds are ideal candidates for a career in business planning. Coursework in math, economics, computer science, writing and public speaking may also benefit business planners in their work.

Other Qualifications

Because business managers make decisions concerning the long-term growth and viability of organisations, leadership skills are particularly important. Good business managers also possess an in-depth understanding of their organisation’s culture, strategic vision, financial position, value proposition and competitive advantages. They communicate effectively and persuasively both in writing and in person. Effective business planners are also powerful public speakers and comfortable when giving presentations or interacting with different levels of an organisation.

Work Environment

Business planning managers usually work indoors, in clean, well-lit offices. Because they typically work on multiple projects simultaneously, they may work more than 40 hours a week, including evenings and weekends. Some business managers may travel frequently, such as those employed by globally-dispersed corporations or ones whose business relationship management duties involve meeting with clients located in different cities. Some business planners may develop work-related stress from working long hours and other job requirements.

Projected Earnings

PayScale estimates business managers in the United States average an annual salary range of £26,819 to £48,636. Business managers with a solid record of job performance may also earn bonus wages ranging from £770 to £6,694. Manager employed by organisations offering profit sharing programs may receive supplemental wages ranging from £1,250 to £4,427. Some business planners may also benefit from commission-based earnings ranging from £2,080 to £17,219. The estimated total annual earnings of business planning managers in the United States, including base salary, bonus, profit sharing and commission, ranges from £26,107 to £49,782, as of June 2010.

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