What is a nabothian cyst?

Written by lars tramilton
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Nabothian cysts are lumps that are filled with mucus that are found on the cervix's surface. The cervix is the lower part of the uterus that extends into the vagina. Nabothian cysts are a type of retention cyst. They result from the blocking of a mucus-producing gland. Nabothian cysts look like tiny, white pimples. Some women have more than one of the cysts.

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Function

The surface of the cervix is made up of a variety of skin cells that are known as the squamous epithelium. Upon the gland obstruction occurring, secretions accumulate within the cells that are plugged up. This creates a round, smooth lump on top of the cervix, called a nabothian cyst.

Symptoms and Treatment

Nabothian cysts generally present no symptoms. The majority of females who have them probably do not even know that they are there. The cysts do not pose any health risks and are considered to be benign, so generally no treatment is necessary. They do not disappear by themselves, but they can be removed through procedures known as cryotherapy and electrocautery, though these are usually not required.

Possible Complications

In certain instances, complications can occur from nabothian cysts. In rare cases, the cysts can become so numerous or large that the then becomes obstructed or enlarged. This could make receiving a Pap smear (a routine gynaecological exam that samples cervical cells to check for any irregularities) difficult.

Discovery

Women usually discover they have nabothian cysts during routine pelvic examinations. The doctor will notice a tiny, round lump (or several of them) on the cervix's surface. Sometimes it is necessary to perform a colposcopy to be able to differentiate nabothian cysts from other sores that can also be found on the cervix.

Frequency

Nabothian cysts most often occur in women who are of reproductive age. They are especially common in women who have already had children, and are significantly less common in those who haven't given birth.

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