X

We Value Your Privacy

We and our partners use technology such as cookies on our site to personalise content and ads, provide social media features, and analyse our traffic. Click below to consent to the use of this technology across the web. You can change your mind and change your consent choices at anytime by returning to this site.

Update Consent
DISCOVER
×
Loading ...

How to cite a policy brief

Updated March 23, 2017

A policy brief is a succinct document that outlines the rationale behind a specific policy choice. Just as with any other source, you must include a policy brief in a reference list at the end of your paper if you use it as a source of information. If you are adhering to Modern Language Association (MLA) or American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines, you should cite a policy brief as you would any other non-periodical Internet source.

Loading ...
  1. List the author's last name, a comma, first initial and a period. For example:

  2. Kirkegaard, J.

  3. List the year in which the brief was issued. This should appear in parentheses and be followed by a comma. For example:

  4. (2010).

  5. List the full title of the brief in italics, followed by a period. List the policy number in parentheses, if available. Capitalise only the first letter of the title, along with the first letters of any proper nouns. For example:

  6. How Europe can muddle through its crisis (Policy brief 10-27).

  7. List the full URL in the following format:

  8. Retrieved from http://www.petersoninstitute.org/publications/interstitial.cfm?ResearchID=1723.

  9. Combine the elements so that the finished citation appears in the following format:

  10. Kirkegaard, J. (2010). How Europe can muddle through its crisis (Policy brief 10-27). Retrieved from http://www.petersoninstitute.org/publications/interstitial.cfm?ResearchID=1723.

  11. List the last name, a comma, first name and a period. For example:

  12. Kirkegaard, Jacob.

  13. List the full title of the brief in italics, followed by a period. For example:

  14. Policy Brief 10-27: How Europe Can Muddle Through Its Crisis.

  15. List the name of the publisher, followed by a comma. For example:

  16. Peterson Institute for International Economics,

  17. List the date of publication, followed by a period. This should appear in a day-month-year format. For example:

  18. 1 Dec. 2010.

  19. List the medium of publication, followed by a period. For example:

  20. Web.

  21. List the date on which you accessed the information, followed by a period. For example:

  22. 1 Dec. 2010.

  23. List the full URL in angle brackets:

  24. http://www.petersoninstitute.org/publications/interstitial.cfm?ResearchID=1723

  25. Combine the elements so that the finished citation appears in the following format:

  26. Kirkegaard, Jacob. Policy Brief 10-27: How Europe Can Muddle Through Its Crisis. Peterson Institute for International Economics, 1 Dec. 2010. Web. 1 Dec. 2010. http://www.petersoninstitute.org/publications/interstitial.cfm?ResearchID=1723

Loading ...

About the Author

Loading ...