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How to Protect the Paint on Gnome Statues

Updated February 21, 2017

Concrete garden gnomes are a common decoration in many gardens. The paint of these gnomes often loses its lustre over the years due to the elements and natural wear of the paint. A garden gnome with no paint looks unappealing on the lawn and ruins its decorative purpose. You can protect your garden gnomes from losing their paint. These techniques can be applied individually or as a group, as none of them will ruin the positive effects of the other techniques.

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  1. Apply a colourless water sealer to your gnome. This will protect your gnome from the wear of rain snow and sleet. Apply it using short, precise strokes around the entire body of the gnome. Reapply the sealer once a year.

  2. Bring your garden gnomes in the house during the winter months. The snow and cold can cause your paint to wear. It can also cause your garden gnome to crack, which can further ruin your paint. Wrap them up in blankets and place them somewhere safe in your home or garage.

  3. Clean all water marks off of your paint by applying a mixture of muratic acid and water. The mixture should be three parts water to each part muratic acid. Apply very lightly, with one or two strokes of application.

  4. Repaint any sections of your gnome that may be peeling or fading. Areas of peeling paint often spread. Applying a light coat of paint on top of the peeling may help stop the peeling process and preserve your paint.

  5. Repair any cracks in your garden gnome by using a clear epoxy. Cracks get worse over time and can cause your paint to crack and peel off your gnome. Apply the epoxy to seal the crack and paint over it to make it harder to notice.

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Things You'll Need

  • Water sealer
  • Muratic acid
  • Brushes
  • Paints
  • Concrete epoxy

About the Author

Eric Benac began writing professionally in 2001. After working as an editor at Alpena Community College in Michigan and receiving his Associate of Journalism, he received a Bachelor of Science in English and a Master of Arts in writing from Northern Michigan University in Marquette.

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