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How to Convert Cake Flour to Self-Rising Flour

Updated February 21, 2017

Self-rising flour is a type of "soft" flour that contains added baking powder and salt. When speaking of flour, the term "soft" indicates a low-protein content. According to Nathalie Dupree in "New Southern Cooking," soft flours, including self-rising flour, are traditional in the American South where lower-protein winter wheat predominates. Plain flour is also a low-protein flour that you can convert to self-rising.

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  1. Measure 1 level cup of plain flour into a mixing bowl. To measure accurately, spoon the flour into the measure and then level off the top using the straight edge of a butter knife or a wooden spatula.

  2. Add 1 tsp of baking powder and 1/4 tsp salt to the flour.

  3. Whisk together all the ingredients.

  4. Tip

    Regular, all-purpose flour is a "hard" flour with a higher protein content. To use all-purpose flour in place of self-rising flour, add 1 1/2 tsp baking powder and 1/2 tsp salt per cup of flour. Be aware that all-purpose flour, and all hard flours, hold more liquid than soft flours. If your recipe specifically calls for self-rising flour, you may also have to add some extra liquid.

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Things You'll Need

  • 1 cup plain flour
  • Butter knife or wooden spatula
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • Mixing bowl
  • Whisk

About the Author

Cathryn Chaney

Cathryn Chaney has worked as a gardening writer since 2002. Her horticultural experience working in the nursery industry informs her garden articles, especially those dealing with arid landscaping and drought-tolerant gardening. Chaney also writes poetry, which has appears in "Woman's World" magazine and elsewhere. Chaney graduated from the University of Arizona in 1992 with a Bachelor of Arts in English.

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