DIY limbo set

Written by molly prather | 13/05/2017
DIY limbo set
Make your own limbo pole at home. (Creatas/Creatas/Getty Images)

Limbo is a great party game that can be played anytime, anywhere. The game is simple: While music is played, two people stand facing each other with poles that have different pins in place holding the limbo pole at a certain height. The goal is for each contestant to lean backwards and attempt to move under the pole without touching it. If he is successful, the pole is moved down a notch, and so on until a winner is named.

Limbo set

To begin, you will need to find two poles of the same length, roughly 1.5 metres / 5 feet long and approximately 25mm / 1 inch in diameter. Bamboo is the preferred wood for the poles because it's lightweight and adds a tropical flair to the set. You can find bamboo at garden centres and/or home-improvement stores. Measure 91 cm / 3 feet from one end of one pole and mark with a pencil. Then, measure and mark every six inches. Repeat this process on the other stick. These markings denote where the nails will be driven into the wood. With a hammer, gently tap in 50mm / 2-inch nails at a bit of an angle so they'll be able to hold the limbo stick while the game is being played. The limbo stick should be approximately 183 cm / 6 feet long and preferably made from bamboo. If you can't find bamboo, be sure that the wood you choose is sanded down so that it won't catch on clothes or skin. To make your limbo set festive, you can paint it to match the type of party you're having.

Playing Limbo

When you're ready to limbo, you'll need music playing while the dancers move underneath the limbo pole. You can use any portable music device such as a boombox, mp3 player with speakers, or if you're lucky enough, you can hire a steel drum band.

Storage

To keep your limbo set intact, you can simply tie the pieces together with twine or rope and store them in a closet or garage. If you'd prefer to protect them from nicks or scratches you can wrap them first in an old sheet before tying them together.

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