What can you spray on furniture to kill scabies?

Written by james dryden | 13/05/2017

Scabies is caused by a mite. The female burrows into human skin and lays its eggs. After the eggs hatch, the larvae grow and feed on the skin, and the cycle continues. Scabies is spread mainly through skin-to-skin contact but can also be spread by contaminated bedding, clothing, towels and linen. On furniture or other surface areas, mites live up to two days, according to cyh.com. Severe itching, sometimes accompanied by allergic reactions, can occur. Treatment lotions and creams are available to treat skin. There are ways to prevent scabies from spreading on furniture and other surface areas.

Measures to Control the Spread of Scabies

While treating skin with a cream containing 5 per cent permethrin insecticide, you'll need to hot-water wash and dry fabrics such as clothing, towels and bedding. Items that aren't washable need to be dry-cleaned. Other things may require you to place them in sealed plastic bags for five days. This will ensure the death of any mites or eggs.

Furniture and Scabies

Begin by vacuuming furniture or mattresses. Apply a hot iron to the surface without placing too much pressure, in order to avoid scorching. Wash chairs with hot soapy water. If necessary, follow by spraying the furniture with permethrin. In addition, car seats and strollers should be sprayed. Allow them to air-dry prior to use.

Warning About Permethrin/Alternatives

While permethrin is a widely used pesticide, don't use it around cats, as it has been shown to be toxic to them, according to GetRidofThings.com. Other mammals may be affected, so it is best to stayaway from the sprayed area and allow it to air-dry, preferably in a warm to hot and non-humid area. There aren't many spray alternatives in treating furniture for scabies. However, tea tree oil and sulphur have been used on human skin with positive results.

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