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Alternative Medicine Treatment for Granuloma Annulare

Updated July 20, 2017

Granuloma annulare is a chronic skin condition consisting of raised, reddish or skin-coloured bumps that form ring patterns and usually appear on hands and feet. According to the Mayo Clinic, most lesions disappear on their own within a few months to two years. The primary concerns with this skin condition are cosmetic and there are many natural treatments that can speed the disappearance of these lesions.

Diet

You can treat granuloma annulare by trying to build up your immune system and having your body heal itself by getting plenty of sleep, exercise and by eating a healthy diet that includes plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, fresh juices and taking a multivitamin supplement. Many nutrient deficiencies can lead to a lowered immunity and skin problems including granuloma annulare.

Remedies

The regular treatment for granuloma annulare includes freezing or cryotherapy, hydrocortisone and light therapy. If you prefer to look further, there are several alternative medicine formulations available on the market for the treatment of this skin disorder including Annurax, Granutab (herbal) and Garnilin (homeopathic). Of all of these treatments, Granutab is the only one that has been proven effective in a clinical trial.

There are many herbs that can treat skin problems such as oak leaf extract which has healing properties for skin, aloe vera and green tea extract have antioxidant and healing properties, a warm washcloth soaked in malva tea can help inflammation and a poultice made up of chaparral, dandelion and yellow dock root can also benefit a rash.

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About the Author

Elizabeth Kahn began writing professionally in 2006, while working in public education. She teaches nutrition to students, families and her local community. Kahn earned her Bachelor of Science in clinical nutrition from UC Davis and is pursuing a Master of Arts in education at Chapman University.