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Plastic canvas patterns to make

Updated February 21, 2017

Plastic Canvas consists of plastic that resembles cross-stitch canvas with holes at regular intervals through which yarn, thread or other fibres may be passed. It is a popular craft because craft projects made in the medium are highly portable, quick and easy to make. Additionally, most of the crafts are versatile, allowing the crafter to create two-dimensional pictures or three-dimensional sculptures.

Tissue box cover

The trick to making a tissue box cover is to cut the pieces a little larger than the tissue box that you are going to cover. To do this, lay the tissue box against the plastic canvas and trace over it with a marker. Cut the canvas just a little larger than the tissue box using the holes in the canvas as a guide. Before you assemble your tissue box, cross-stitch all of the pieces in one colour. Join the pieces at the edges and whipstitch together in a contrasting colour.

Bookmarks

A plastic canvas bookmark is an easy project with which to teach a smaller child how to cross-stitch. The larger holes of the canvas are easier for tiny hands to work with. To make this bookmark double sided, stitch your pattern on two pieces of canvas, align them back to back and then whipstitch them together. Work out the pattern in advance using a piece of graph paper. Cut the canvas for your bookmark to be 5cm / 2 inches wide by 15cm / 6 inches long. Carefully follow your graph paper guide to build your design.

Easter Basket

An Easter basket is an easy and inexpensive project that can be created with little stitching. Use a white piece of canvas and yellow yarn. Cut five squares of plastic canvas that measure the same in size. Align four of them at the sides and whip stitch the sides together so that they form a square. Stitch the fifth square to form the bottom of your basket. To make a handle, cut a piece of canvas that measures 5cm / 2 inches wide by 20cm / 8 inches long. Sew each end to the sides of the basket by overlapping the holes in the two edges and making three cross-stitches in the sides. Whipstitch around the top edges of the basket and the basket handle for a decorative finish.

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About the Author

Tracy Morris has been a freelance writer since 2000. She has published novels and numerous online articles. Her work has appeared in national magazines and newspapers including "Ferrets," "CatFancy," "Lexington Herald Leader" and "The Tulsa World." She holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the University of Arkansas.