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DIY oven steam cleaning

Everyone would like to have a nice shiny oven that is ready for baking at the drop of a hat. However, the reality is that most of us have ovens that could use a little cleaning. Oven cleaners tend to be harsh chemicals that are toxic for our lungs and skin and can damage surfaces around the oven. You can rent a steam cleaner and clean your oven as well as other surfaces around your home, or you can steam clean a grubby oven yourself using a little ingenuity and elbow grease.

Vacuum the surfaces

When you open your oven door and look at the bottom floor of the oven, there are probably small piles of charred food bits that need to be removed. A simple way to do this is by using a hose attachment on your vaccuum cleaner and sucking up all the loose grit in your oven. This will allow the steam to penetrate to the grease and grime stuck on the oven surface. Don't use a brush attachment on the hose as it might have greasy bits of food stick to it that will need to be cleaned.

Steam the oven

Turn the oven on to 176ºC and let it heat up. Once it has reached the full 176ºC, turn it off. Use a spray bottle to spray all the surfaces of the oven. Have a pot of boiling water ready and place it on the oven shelf and close the door. Let it sit for at least 30 minutes. During this time the grime will soften and loosen from the surface of the oven.

Wipe out the oven

Don some rubber gloves and scrub the oven's surface with steel wool. This can only be done if the grates are removed, so set them aside and clean them in the sink. A little dish detergent can be added to your steel wool pad to help break down residual grease. Once everything has been loosened, use a large rag to wipe down the inside of the oven, starting at the top, working down the sides and then the bottom. Rinse your rag often. Steam clean your oven once a month for best results.

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About the Author

Maryland resident Heide Braley is a professional writer who contributes to a variety of websites. She has focused more than 10 years of research on botanical and garden articles and was awarded a membership to the Society of Professional Journalists. Braley has studied at Pennsylvania State University and Villanova University.