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Video transcription

Alright, hello ladies and gentleman. My name is Reggie Hayes with Expert Village, and we are talking about choosing or putting together home theater systems and in particular let's get into receivers. Now, you get this nice receiver at the store and you get it home. Let me tell you the first thing to do before you even hook it up, is you pull this out right here. Trust me, read it, it doesn't matter where you read it, the bathroom whatever, it doesn't matter. And guys I am talking to you especially, because I know how we can be sometimes, but trust me this will save you a lot of headaches and a lot of confusion down the road. Now when you are picking a stereo, don't pick one for the things that you need today. Pick one for the stuff you think you might have later on down the road. If you think you're going to have a high definition DVD player down the road, and I know those are coming out, it's good to take those things into consideration when you're choosing an audio receiver. Now this one in particular does video and audio at the same time. In other words, when you select a component right here, rather your switching from your VCR, your DVD player, your cable box, anything like that it also switches the audio and video, so that's a really cool feature to have. As you can see right here, this one is set up for high definition TV, which is another cool thing to have and they are really starting to put these into stereo receivers these days. The reason you would want a stereo that would switch video with audio, is if you've got a TV. that has very limited input. Now, looking at the back of this stereo it looks pretty intimidating, right? I mean you got a lot of stuff back here. You have all these inputs, or excuse me, all these outputs for speakers. You have all these inputs for 7.1 surround sound and you have all these video inputs. Trust me, the easiest thing, the easiest thing that you can do whenever you are looking at these stereos is to figure out one thing, alright? You have figure out, is audio leaving or is audio coming in and trust me if you can figure that out you will be a lot better off. So, wrapping it up here, if you look at it, this is going to have a video out, this is going to go out to your TV. but it's going to accept all these video inputs and the cool thing about it is they're all labeled. So, it's a lot of stuff right here and the same thing with the audio, the audio is either going to come in or it's going to go out. It may need to go out to the VCR to record or it may need to go to the DVD recorder, anything like that. So, anyway that's pretty much it for stereo receivers and good luck.