DISCOVER
×

Video transcription

Hi! I'm Chad Smith and I'm a State Certified Journeyman wireman; basically an electrician. We are hanging a ceiling fan in this house. Now we've already been through all the steps of shutting the power off, testing it and removing the old ceiling fan and we are in the process of hanging the new one. We already have the base up there and we are just going to hang the ceiling fan itself. This is a very, very simple process. We have talked earlier, briefly about the different types of ceiling fan brackets; there are really only two out there. This one happens to be the half circle type bracket and on this bracket right here, I wanted to point out that there is a groove on here. What this groove does is on the bracket there is a little nub on there. That groove hooks on the nub and makes it to where the whole ceiling fan base doesn't spin. Just the motor itself. So just basically just take these wires and hold them off to the side, set that in the thing, make sure that groove is on the little nob and you are done. The ceiling fan is hung. It is that simple to do. You will notice that there is two wires coming out of your ceiling. You have a white wire and a black wire. The black wire is your power lead; the white wire is your neutral. Coming out of your ceiling fan you have four wires. You have a ground, a white, a blue, a black and a blue. Now basically these are very simple; don't let these scare you. The ground, since we don't have a grounded system in this house, we will just shove this up in the box. Now if you had a home or a newer home with a grounded system, you will see a bare copper wire. You would just hook that ground onto that bare copper wire. That's for a grounded system. The next step would be just to take the white and land it on the white lead coming out of the ceiling and put this wire net on. These wire nuts, you can get these anywhere at any home improvement store or hardware store and this is what you want to use to put these wires together. Don't just twist these together and put tape on them because you run the risk of that joint coming loose and creating a short and we don't want to do that. Now on this ceiling fan, we have a light kit and the fan itself. Now in some homes you will have a black wire and a red wire. The black wire is to feed the ceiling fan, the actual fan itself and the red wire if you had one, would be to control the lights. But on this situation, we only have one switch controlling both of them. So what you would do is take the black and the blue and just twist them together like this. That way when you twist them together it feeds both the fan and the light off the same power supply. Just take and put the black and the blue to the black, put your wire nut on there, make sure it is nice and tight, twist it down nice and tight and that is really all there is. Now you will see a green here. In this house and in most houses, older homes 30 to 40 years old, they don't have a grounding system. Basically that is the wire, the bare copper wire inside the box. This house doesn't have that so really all we have to do is just shove that green wire up into the box and don't worry about it. Now if you have a house, a newer house with a ground system in it, just attach that green wire to the bare copper wire and you are all grounded. It's that simple. I'm Chad Smith and we are hanging this ceiling fan today.