Chevy s-10 blazer alignment specifications

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Chevy s-10 blazer alignment specifications
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Chevrolet introduced the S-10 Blazer as a two-door, compact SUV inspired by the S-10 Pickup truck in 1983. Chevy dropped the "S-10" from the vehicle's official name in 1995, when the second generation of Blazers came out. The 1994 S-10 Blazer came in several two-wheel-drive and four-wheel-drive trims. All trims shared the same alignment specs. The alignment was not adjustable on the rear end of the 1994 S-10 Blazer because it came with a fixed rear axle. The caster angle, camber angle and toe were adjustable on the font end.

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Caster

The caster angle of a vehicle's wheels is an imaginary line drawn through the upper ball joint and lower ball joint of the wheel when viewed from the side of the car. If the line were perfectly vertical, the caster angle would be zero. For most cars, the top of the line would fall to the right of the vertical line when looking at the driver's side of the vehicle, meaning that the line would slant toward the rear of the car. This is known as a positive caster.

For the 1994 Chevy S-10 Blazer, the caster angle can range from +1.5 degrees to +2.5 degrees, with the ideal setting being +2.0 degrees and the cross tolerance being +0.5 degrees.

Camber

The camber is the angle that a wheel leans when looked at from the front of a vehicle. If the wheel is perfectly vertical, the camber is zero. If the top of the wheel leans out, away from the engine block, it has a positive camber. If the top of the wheel leans in, toward the engine block, it has a negative camber.

The camber angle on 1994 Chevy S-10 Blazers can range from +0.3 degrees to +1.3 degrees, with the ideal setting being +0.8 degrees and the cross tolerance being +0.5 degrees.

Toe-in

The toe is the angle the wheels of a vehicle are pointed in relation to the centerline of the vehicle. It is rare for a vehicle to be designed so that the wheels are perfectly perpendicular to a vehicle's centerline. In most cases, the wheel's point slightly toward each other at the front to help relieve pressure on the steering joints and suspension. This is referred to as toe-in.

The toe-in on the 1994 Chevy S-10 Blazer can range from +0.1 degrees to +0.5 degrees, with the ideal setting being +0.3 degrees.

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