Tools to Chop Wood

Written by hillary marshall Google
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
Tools to Chop Wood
Single-bit axes have a cutting edge on one side only, and are safer than double-bit axe for chopping wood. (chopping wood image by sumos from Fotolia.com)

There is much more to chopping wood than swinging an axe. Many tools are used to get the job done safely, efficiently and correctly. Naturally, you will use an axe, but you will also need a few other tools. Chopping wood is a time-honoured tradition in many families, and the tools used to get the job done right have not changed much over the generations.

Other People Are Reading

Axe

You have many choices when it comes to selecting an axe for wood chopping. A single-bit axe (with a cutting edge on one side) is considered the safest option for cutting limbs. A basic long-handled felling axe with a thin profile is best for chopping a tree and getting limbs to the desired length. An axe with a thicker profile will not make deep notches when chopping trees.

Splitting Mauls

To chop wood you also need splitting mauls. A splitting maul is a long-handled hammer on which one side of the head is a sledge hammer and the other an axe. It is used to split a piece of wood along its grain. It is also called a "block buster" in some countries.

Jack Hammer

A jack hammer has a large, square head, is used for driving wedges when chopping wood. Using a lighter jack hammer of 1.36 Kilogram or less will help lessen he likelihood that you damage the wedge when using it.

Splitting Wedges

Splitting wedges are thick on one and tapered to a cutting edge on the other. They are used to provide leverage into a cut in wood so that a hammer or mallet can be used with force to separate the wood.

Splitting Froe

A splitting froe can also be used when chopping wood, and especially when chopping kindling wood. This tool has a long heavy blade set on a right angle of a long handle. The froe is used in place of a wedge to divide a larger block of wood into several smaller sections. Once in place the froe is tapped with a mallet or hammer just as a wedge would be.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.