Cobra 3100 I/H Iron Specifications

Written by izzy barden
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In 2006, Cobra golf introduced its line of 3100 I/H irons. The design was modelled to mix the force and workability of a standard blade iron with the forgiveness and consistency of a cavity-back. The weighting system in the head catered to a higher ball flight and a softer feel than conventional clubs. As of 2010, Cobra was no longer manufacturing the 3100 I/H series of irons.

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Club Head

The 3100 I/H irons were constructed with cast iron heads for durability and consistency. The base of the head contained the majority of the weight, lowering the centre of gravity and producing a high trajectory ball flight. The top half of the club head has a slight cavity-back to reduce spin and promote forgiveness. The standard set comes with a 3-iron through pitching wedge, however speciality wedges and longer irons can be custom-built to match.

Club Shaft

The stock shaft for most 3100 I/H irons is strong flex True Temper steel to provide more control over approach shots from either the fairway or rough. Golfers with a weaker swing may want a shaft with a weaker flex in order to add some extra force at the point of impact. Graphite shafts in a variety of flexes can also be fitted into the irons to give a unique and different feel that some prefer to steel.

Counterfeit Clubs

Cobra urges all potential buyers to purchase merchandise from approved vendors only. Internet auction websites are completely unauthorised and can often times lead to the purchase of counterfeit clubs. Many dealers are locate throughout the country in golf outlet stores, retail stores or even golf courses. If purchasing from an unauthorised vendor, examine all merchandise closely and whenever possible compare it against legitimate merchandise to note any discrepancies in logo, insignia or design.

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