Specifications of the Shelby GT500 Eleanor

Written by keith owings
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Eleanor was the name given to the GT500 Shelby used in the movie, "Gone in 60 Seconds," starring Nicholas Cage. It was designed after the 1967 model of the GT500. More than £162,500 was spent in re-designing this car for its movie role, which called for sport tires and a hood scoop, among other things.

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The 1967 GT500 could reach 60mph from a standstill in 7.2 seconds and complete a quarter-mile in 15.5 seconds. It had a top speed of 132mph.

7.1-Liter Engine

The GT500 came with two engine choices. The standard V8 engine was 7.1-litre that generated 355 horsepower at 5,400rpm and 420ft.-lb. of torque at 3,200rpm. This resulted in a weight-to-power ratio of 4.49kg. per horsepower. The 430.3-cubic-inch engine had a single overhead camshafts with two valves per cylinder, for a total for 16 valves. The engine came standard with a four-speed-manual transmission.

7-Liter Engine

The 7-liter V8 engine generated 400 horsepower and 475ft.-lb. of torque at 3,400rpm, and had a compression ratio of 11.6 to 1. This resulted in a weight-to-power ratio of 3.99kg. per horsepower. The single overhead camshafts operated two valves per cylinder, for a total of 16 valves. It also utilised a four-speed-manual transmission.

Changes Made for the Movie

For the purposes of the stunts in "Gone in 60 Seconds," the Shelby engine was replaced with a Ford 428 that generated 650 horsepower. This was increased to 1,000 horsepower with nitrous oxide. A new body kit was added, along with fully functioning side pipes and mag wheels. An automatic transmission was also added to make stunt scenes easier for the drivers. In total, 11 Eleanors were created for the movie, but each one had slightly different designs, based on the role they were expected to perform in the movie.

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