Specifications of the Kawasaki GPX

Written by andrew latham
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
Specifications of the Kawasaki GPX
The Kawasaki GPX series offered users a sensible compromise between sports and touring bike. (Andrew Dernie/Photodisc/Getty Images)

The Kawasaki GPX series were marketed as a sensible sports and touring bikes. Kawasaki has produced several bikes under the GPX series, including the GPX250, GPX 600R and GPX 750R. These bikes provide sensible and sturdy riding with few surprises. Nowadays they are not likely to turn many heads, but they are a great bike to start on, if you can find them.

Other People Are Reading

Kawasaki GPX 250 R

The Kawasaki GPX 250 R is the smallest bike in the series and was introduced as an entry-level sports bike. It has a 248-cc, liquid cooled, v-twin, four-stroke engine with four valves per cylinder, 36 horsepower at 11,000 revolutions per minute and a torque of 24.5 newtons meter. It has a six-speed gearbox, front hydraulic telescopic fork suspension and a UNI-TRAK system, single-shock rear suspension. The bike's dimensions are 80.1 inches long, 28 inches wide and 43.1 inches tall.

Kawasaki GPX 600 R

The Kawasaki GPX 600 R, with a top speed of 140 miles per hour, upped the ante of the GPX series' commitment to sports bikes. The engine is an in-line four, four-stroke with a displacement of 592-cubic centimetres and 85 horsepower at 11,000 revolutions per minute. It has a six-speed gearbox and front chain transmission.

Kawasaki GPX 750 R

Kawasaki introduced the GPX 750 R in 1986 as a sport tourer, by making it more comfortable for longer rides, but without giving up the sport end of the bike. The engine is a four-stroke, transverse four-cylinder, liquid-cooled engine with a displacement of 742-cubic centimetres. It has a top speed of 148.4 miles per hour, 106 horsepower and a maximum torque of 77.8 newtons meter.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.