Disabled Car Parking Requirements

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Disabled Car Parking Requirements
Car parks must have disabled parking available. (Handicap Parking image by Joelyn Pullano from Fotolia.com)

Any location that provides parking will have a few disabled parking spots available, which are marked with blue lines and a sign stating that the parking space is reserved for disabled individuals. The American with Disabilities Act, or ADA, defines disabilities and determines appropriate actions towards individuals with disabilities. It even determines the requirements for disabled parking.

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Parking Spot Size

According to the ADA, disabled parking spots must have a width of at least 96 inches. They not only are required to meet the minimum width requirements, but they must also have a parking access aisle. The aisle is necessary for anyone in a wheelchair so they have space. The size of the parking spot is usually slightly larger for those with difficulty parking. Two handicap parking spots next to each other are allowed to share an aisle.

Disabled Parking Location

The parking spot must have the nearest space to the entrance so disabled individuals are not travelling far distances to get to the building.

Number of Parking Spaces

Disabled parking spaces have minimum numbers based on the size of the car park. The smaller lots are not required to have as many handicap parking spots as the larger car parks. Every car park must have at least one handicap or disabled parking spot in an appropriate size for parking a van. Car parks with 26 to 50 spaces must have at least one car and one van parking spot allotted for disabled parking. Any car park with over 500 parking spaces must set aside 2 per cent of the parking spaces for disabled parking.


Any car park that has a pedestrian curb, stairs or similar space must provide a ramp for wheelchair and disabled access. The ramp is located by the disabled parking spaces for ease of access and does not have abrupt changes. It should have a gentle upward slope and slip resistant measures to prevent injuries.

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