Most Popular Types of Wine

Written by katie gwinn
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Most Popular Types of Wine
From vine to bottle, the grape is the foundation of wine excellence. (bunch of grapes image by kolesn from Fotolia.com)

Wine has been a popular beverage for centuries and the reds and whites dominate the front in wine consumption. Many types of wine are produced in Europe, the Americas and other countries. The wines that remain favoured classics in restaurants and wine shops tend to be the good introductory types that are easy on the palate, dynamic in flavour and affordable.

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Cabernet Sauvignon

Cabernet Sauvignon is the name of the grape variety and the wine. It is known for its complexity and richness and a mellow and mild but hearty taste. It has a deep red colour and a fruity and spicy essence. The wine is traditionally aged slowly in oak and grows bolder with time. Cabernet is especially good with red meat, game fowl cooked with herbs and with cheddar cheese, Brie and chocolate. The Cabernet is a small, blue grape that can be grown around the world.

Chardonnay

The Chardonnay is also a grape variety and an extremely popular white wine and used as a blender in sparkling wines and Champagne. It is the exclusive grape variety grown in Chablis, Burgundy, in France, but can be grown just about anywhere. It is the most commonly planted grape in California. Wine growers love it because the vines have high yields and the grape is dynamic in character. Wine drinkers love it for its versatility of flavour and range of price. A Chardonnay is usually dry with a citrus flavour and goes well with pork, seafood and poultry and with the sweeter, creamier cheeses.

Merlot

Merlot was brought to France in the first century and named Merlot in the 1800s. It is now grown around the globe. Traditionally a blending wine because it doesn't age well, the Merlot gained popularity in the 1990s as an excellent wine on its own merits. It is softer and more mellow than most red wines and can be drunk earlier due to lower tannin content. The taste varies with flavours reminiscent of black cherry, violet, and orange. Merlot is good with heavy red meats, wild game, red pasta dishes and chocolate.

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