List of Disabilities for Social Security Disability

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List of Disabilities for Social Security Disability
Social Security provides benefits for both mental disabilities as well as physical. (man in wheelchair image by jimcox40 from Fotolia.com)

If you've recently become disabled, it may be confusing trying to determine whether you qualify for disability insurance under Social Security. Some disabilities like chronic pain and mental conditions, dubbed "invisible disabilities," may be especially tricky to verify since they are not as recognisable as other disabilities. Generally, if your disability has made it impossible to continue your previous work or you have been diagnosed with a condition that will last a year or result in death, you probably qualify for Social Security benefits. Additionally, a combination of less severe disabilities may also allow you to qualify for benefits.

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Compassionnate Allowances

There are certain conditions that qualify for disability instantly upon diagnosis. These include leukaemia, Lou Gehrig's disease, and pancreatic cancer. Blindness is also an instant qualifier for disability benefits.

Neurological

Qualifying neurological disabilities include epilepsy, brain tumours, problems with motor function, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral palsy.

Respiratory

Chronic lung infections and episodic respiratory disease (asthma, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis) are examples of qualifying respiratory disabilities.

Cardiovascular

A qualifying cardiovascular disability must affect proper functioning of the heart or circulatory system. Chronic heart failure and vein or artery disorders (aneurysms, obstructions or ruptures) are examples of qualifying cardiovascular disabilities.

Musculoskeletal

These disabilities include loss of function of joints, arthritis, fractures, and soft tissue injuries. In order for your musculoskeletal disability to qualify, it must hinder your ability to perform gross and fine movements (meaning an inability to move independently for more than a short period of time).

Mental Disorders

Anxiety disorders (depression, anxiety, panic disorders, post traumatic stress), eating disorders, disorientation, memory problems, and psychotic disorders (schizophrenia or paranoia) are all examples of qualifying mental disabilities.

Other Disabilities

Hematological disorders (anaemia, other blood diseases), skin disorders (lesions, tumours, photosensitivity), autoimmune disorders (HIV, organ problems), malignant neoplastic diseases, impairments of the endocrine system, and genitourinary impairments are all examples of other conditions that qualify as disabilities.

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