21st Birthday Speech Ideas

Written by carmen laboy
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21st Birthday Speech Ideas
You might talk about the birthday boy's childhood love of bugs. (happy birthday image by Ewe Degiampietro from Fotolia.com)

Twenty-first birthdays are a major turning point in the lives of young adults. Congratulating your friend or relative using a speech can be a great way to publicly recognise them for their accomplishments or to simply show your affection on that special day. There are all kinds of topics you can use to make your speech.

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Accomplishments

One way to approach the speech is to talk about the celebrated person's accomplishments. Graduations are the most obvious subject, but you can also discuss things like the person's work success, hobbies, a recent long distance run the person participated in and more. For example you might start the speech by saying something like, "We are here to celebrate our friend Tom. He is a great guy and now everyone else can see it too since he was voted Most Popular at his college graduation," at which point you would describe how he is a great guy and why he is the most popular. Choose something that uniquely highlights your friend and his successes.

Age

Age brings a lot of legal rights that aren't always well known. Turning 21 in the United States has become synonymous with a drunken all-night party, but it doesn't have to be. At 21 you can legally buy a home or a car, among other rights. You might write your speech about your friend's lifelong dream of owning a business and tie it into the fact that they can finally do so legally, with all that that entails, including getting insured and renting a location.

Memories

If you've been asked to write a speech about someone then you are probably close to them, have known them a long time or are important to them. This puts you in the unique position of knowing all the "in-jokes" and silly stories. A cute story about something the person has done is usually well received, but you should be careful not to use anecdotes that are too embarrassing or that might get the person in trouble. A story about the honoree's childhood lisp might be cute, but one about their alcohol problem is probably not ideal.

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