Substitutes for Blanched Almond Flour

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Substitutes for Blanched Almond Flour
Blanched almond flour is made from ground almonds. (almonds image by Nicola Gavin from Fotolia.com)

Almond flour, sometimes called almond meal, is made from finely grinding almonds into a flourlike consistency. Blanched almond flour is made from blanched almonds---almonds that have been briefly cooked in boiling water and then immediately rinsed with cold water to preserve nutrients and enzymes. Almond flour is commonly used in baking, particularly low-carb recipes. But for many people, almond allergies are common. Individuals with an almond allergy or sensitivity must use an appropriate substitute.

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Flax Meal

Flax meal is made from grinding flax seeds into a flourlike consistency. Like almond flour, flax meal is thick and grainy with a light nutty and earthy taste. Flax meal is also low in carbohydrates but high in fat and protein like almond flour. Flax meal can be substituted for almond flour in a 1:1 ratio, meaning substitute 1 cup of flax meal for 1 cup of almond flour called for in the recipe.

Nut Flours

Flours made from other nuts such as peanuts or cashews can be substituted for almond flour. To make these flours, grind the nuts using a food processor or grinder until they are finely processed into a flourlike consistency. Depending on the nut you select, the flavour may be similar to almond flour or slightly different, but the nutritional analysis of nut flours to almond flour will be similar. Nut flours can be substituted for almond flour in a 1:1 ratio.

Bean Flours

Popular in gluten-free baking, bean flours, which are usually made from ground-up beans like chickpeas, are high in protein like almond flour, but they are also higher in carbohydrates and much lower in fat. Bean-based flours tend to be slightly dryer and more fine than almond flour, so you may need to add additional liquid or fat to the recipe. Use bean-based flours in a 1:1 ratio for substitution.

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