Nerf wars rules

Written by scott haines
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
Nerf wars rules
(Jupiterimages/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images)

Nerf war games are played with Nerf launchers. These battles can erupt in fields, playgrounds and anywhere foam-launching devices may be used. Some games that can be played using Nerf launchers are capture the flag, deathmatch and infection. These games require forming teams and can be played with small or large groups of people.

Other People Are Reading

Capture the Flag

Objective: In Capture the flag or CTF flags are placed in two bases, one for each team. The teams try to steal the flag from the opposite team's base and bring it back to their own base while the flag is still in their own base. Doing this earns the team a point. When one team gets to three points, the game is over.

Players: CTF requres two teams of equal size. Five players on each team is the smallest number of people that can play the game.

Field: The field for CTF needs to be very specific. There must be two areas that can be bases for the two teams. The play area has to be medium to small in size due to the amount of running needed to get the flag back to the other base. It must be symmetrical so no team has an advantage over the other. The last criteria for the play area is there should be multiple paths between the bases so there is a possibility for flanking to the other base.

Preparation: According to Nerf-Wars.com, CTF requires a lot of preparation and should only be attempted by someone who has considerable experience planning Nerf wars. The organiser has to coordinate a large group of people and a set up an area that is symmetrical.

Deathmatch

Objective: In deathmatch, players are organised into two teams. Each team tries to shoot the other team while avoiding foam darts from the other team. There are no sides to the field, so players can kill or be killed anywhere. There are two rules for being hit in deathmatch: The first is when someone gets hit, the player must sit out until the round is over. When all members of one team are out, the round is over. The team with members still on the field gets a point. The other rule is each person has three lives. The first two times a player gets hit the player has to leave the field for 15 seconds. After 15 seconds, the player can enter again. After the player gets hit the third time, the player is out for the round.

Players: Deathmatch is a two-team game. There has to be a minimum of four players for two teams of two. Having more players can make the game last longer and make it more complex. Make sure you have a way to tell friend from foe. This could be coloured shirts or a band that goes around team members' arms.

Field: Deathmatch requires a field of medium to large size. If the field is bare, the battle can be similar to the tactics of 1812. The field can also have lots of obstacles for team members to hide behind and get flanking positions on the enemy.

Preparation: A group of people can spontaneously decide to have a Nerf war deathmatch, or they can plan it in advance. Deathmatch can be played anywhere.

Infection

Objective: Infection can sometimes be called Zombie. During infection, one player is chosen to be the infected or zombie. The infected tries to hunt down the other players. When the infected hits another player the person is then infected and must then hunt down other players. When only one player remains, another round begins with the last man standing as the infected.

Players: This game can be played with as little as three players or a maximum of 20.

Field: Infection can be played on any medium to large field. There should be enough space that when most players are infected, there are still enough places to hide. This game is best suited for an outdoor field with trees and boulders as obstacles.

Preparation: As this game can be played with as little as three players and a maximum of 20. It does not require much preparation time.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.