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Problems with Roller Blinds

Updated April 17, 2017

When it comes to window decor, roller blinds have been the most popular choice for commercial interiors, such as offices, while curtains have been the traditional option for residential window decor However, more and more people have made the switch to using roller blinds at home for a number of reasons, including their versatility in a design scheme. Before installing them in your home, though, consider the problems that may occur with roller blinds.

Ventilation

Roller blinds are intended to block light from coming into a room, but they also prevent window ventilation. Roller blinds are a solid panel, which means that rather than reaching through curtains or conventional blinds, you will need to first roll up the blinds if you want to keep a window open but still utilise your roller blinds to block the light. The problem then is that unlike curtains, which flow freely in the breeze of open window, the stiffer fabric blinds may become damaged, ripped or torn.

Cleaning

Keeping your roller blinds clean is not only good for the overall environment of the room but can also improve the lifespan of your roller blinds. Roller blinds are available in a variety of materials and some are easier to clean than others. Fabric blinds are more difficult to keep clean than other surfaces. Roller blinds are also susceptible to fingerprints and stains, so homes with high traffic, pets or small children should refrain from using roller blinds comprised of fabric or other surfaces that don't easily wipe clean. Vinyl blinds are more susceptible to discolouration, cracking and tearing due to sun exposure and excessive use.

Technical

Technical problems with roller blinds may occur when a string becomes entangled or the blinds roll unevenly, which usually indicates a problem with the rolling mechanism. The rolling mechanism may also break, which will require replacing the blinds. Some higher-end roller blinds are operable by remote control, which can lead to issues with remote sensors and other technical problems, as well as a need to change batteries.

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About the Author

Based in South Florida, Leann Harms has been writing since 2008. Her design, technology, business and entertainment articles have appeared in "Design Trade" magazine and Web sites including eHow. Harms has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Florida Atlantic University.