Tile Repair Products

Written by tyler lacoma
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Tile Repair Products
Repair tile with a grout and epoxy. (ceramic tile image by Karin Lau from Fotolia.com)

Tile is designed to last many years, preferably the lifetime of the house, but sometimes accidents occur. The surface of tough ceramic, porcelain or stone tiles are sometimes damaged by sudden impacts, cracking the tile. In other cases, the adhesive used behind the tile can begin to wear away (usually because of moisture problems), creating a loose tile which may slip out from its place. Homeowners can often repair the tile section with the proper tile repair products, depending on the extent of the damage.

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Tile Filler

Tile filler is designed to cover up obvious cracks in the tile before they can spread too far. While tile filler is effective at lengthening the lifespan of a tile, it also comes with challenges. When homeowners dab the filler onto the cracks, it typically dries a white or grey colour, and its texture doesn't match that of surrounding tile. Homeowners need to purchase matching tile paint to properly use tile filler.


Epoxy is a plastic resin that hardens into a solid that binds other materials together. Homeowners can use epoxy to bind tiles back onto the wall or floor without completely removing them, which is more ideal for large or expensive tiles. The epoxy is used with an injection device that squeezes the resin behind the tile.


When homeowners perform tile repair, they usually need to regrout, especially if they are drilling into the old grout, which is a challenge because old grouts are difficult to properly match in colour and texture. However, many home improvement stores offer a variety of grouts to choose from based on the colour and type of tile.

Thinset Mortar

Thinset mortar is used when replacing a section of tile completely. The mortar is mixed and applied to the section of wall or flooring where the tile was removed. The new tile is pressed on the mortar and held there until it dries, cementing the tile in place.

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