The Effects of Backyard Skate Ramp Noise

Written by richard ristow
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The Effects of Backyard Skate Ramp Noise
Half-pipe. (skater su rampa 3 image by antonio putini from Fotolia.com)

Just about anybody who loves skateboarding wishes they could have a ramp in their backyard. It sounds super convienent. There would be no going to crowded skate parks, and there would be no threat of harrassment by police or security guards while skating on the street. It sounds great; however, there are drawbacks regarding noise that must be considered.

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Neighbours

Most people have neighbours, unless they live in the countryside or somewhere as isolated. It does not matter if the ramp is made of plywood, concrete, or metal; it will make noise when somebody is riding it. This can take the form of the parts rubbing or grinding together, or just the noise of the skateboard itself. Neighbours will not appreciate loud noises disrupting their lives constantly, especially at night. Many municipal governments have backyard ramp regulations written into their codes and ordinances. Campbell, California, for example, specifically mandates that noise cannot exceed 60 decibels or poise a nuisance to the neighbours.

Loud Material

When thinking about building a back yard ramp, possible materials pose interesting questions to think about. Naturally, to keep tensions to a minimum, one would want to build a ramp that makes as little noise as possible. Concrete makes the least amount of noise, according to the Skate Park Association of the United States of America, which makes a strong point in favour of a pool or a bowl. Wood frames are a little louder, but the materials with the potential to generate the highest decible readings are metal, fibreglass and other synthetic materials.

People and Parties

So, let's say somebody opts for smooth concrete kidney shaped pool; noise can still pose a problem. Skateboard ramps attract skaters; it is that simple. While this can be a positive thing, many would argue that they built a backyard ramp to get away from the bustle of skate parks. Drawing crowds also can create noise that irritates neighbours.

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