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Colours that complement lime green

Updated February 21, 2017

Some colours are just tough to work with -- neon yellow, bright orange, and fluorescent pink are examples. The shades themselves are so bold they threaten to undermine or overpower any accompanying colour. Lime green can be difficult as well. Absolutes such as white and black, neutrals such as beige can prove your safest choices to complement lime green.

Black

Black is an absolute. It represents the absence of colour. So it is always an excellent choice to accompany bright colours in the home. You can toss lime-green pillows onto your black leather sofa as accents. In the bedroom, lime-green sheets can be offset by a lime-and-black print comforter and a quilted black headboard. In the bath, lime-green rugs make a lovely counterpoint to black marble sinks, floors or countertops.

White

White is another absolute. At the opposite end of the value scale, it is considered pure light, according to the "Munsell Color System" by T.M. Cleland. Pure white and off-white shades work well with lime green. Consider the effect of a lime green ottoman set against a cream-coloured rug or carpeting. Lime green window coverings against walls of off-white bisque make a definite design statement. An off-white wall with grey undertones makes a perfect foil to lime green print or solid wall hangings.

Beige

Beige is a neutral colour. It does not compete with bright colours (or dark colours). A lime-green vase is well suited to the beige of an oak side table. Lime green dinnerware looks cool and clean against the light beige of a birch dining table. A lime green standing lamp can make a bold counterpoint to eco-conscious bamboo flooring. And nothing says summer like lime green cushions on beige wicker or rattan seating.

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About the Author

D. Laverne O'Neal, an Ivy League graduate, published her first article in 1997. A former theater, dance and music critic for such publications as the "Oakland Tribune" and Gannett Newspapers, she started her Web-writing career during the dot-com heyday. O'Neal also translates and edits French and Spanish. Her strongest interests are the performing arts, design, food, health, personal finance and personal growth.