Socks for circulation problems

Written by abigail o'connell
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Socks for circulation problems
Diabetics experience poor circulation, which causes foot discomfort. (baby socks image by pearlguy from Fotolia.com)

Many people suffer from poor circulation due to a variety of medical conditions, including diabetes. People with poor circulation often experience a loss of feeling, sensitivity, foot sores and risk infection in their feet when wearing traditional socks with elastic in the cuff. These symptoms can be relieved by wearing socks without binding elastic and well-padded soles.

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Non-Binding Socks

Non-binding socks do not contain elastic at the ankle, making them a good choice for someone with poor circulation. The socks are made from a nylon, cotton and spandex blend. The socks are available with patterns for wearing with dress trousers or traditional cotton-ribbed style for wearing with tennis shoes or jeans. The socks are available for men and women and come in a variety of lengths.

Circulation Socks

Circulation socks are specifically designed for people with diabetes or circulation problems. The socks are made entirely from cotton. The top of the sock is not restrictive and extends to mid-calf level. The socks are cushioned to be comfortable for walking. The seam of the sock in the toe is low-profile, which reduces irritation. Circulation socks are available in a variety of colours and sizes for men and women.

Therapy socks

Therapy socks are designed to relieve symptoms of foot pain associated with diabetes. The cuff of the sock does not bind and is made with pile padding to support the soles of your feet. Therapy socks are made using bio-ceramic far infrared materials. The infrared rays from the socks penetrate into the soft tissues of the feet and increases circulation, relieving discomfort in the feet.

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